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The Myth of the .38 Snub Nose Revolver as a Good First Gun

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We’ve all seen it in a gun shop. Maybe we’ve even been the recipient of the sales pitch.

“Looking for a first gun, huh? Well you can’t go wrong with a .38 snub nose revolver. We have this super lightweight titanium model here, weighs next to nothing. Here, let me get you some +P+ rounds for it…”

I’m not sure when the snub nose revolver became the de-facto choice for a first gun, or why gun shops push them in this role so hard. You see them especially pushed on women.

However, mastering a snub nose, especially one of the newer, ultra-light weight models, especially with high pressure loads, is one of the hardest things to master. It requires tons of practice with a gun that really isn’t too much fun to shoot. This is especially true of more modern revolvers which often incorporate additional internal safeties which makes the trigger pull even longer and heavier.

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  • parlayer

    S&W 649 .357, would be my choice for a snubby.

  • James Foley

    I like my stainless steel 4 inch barreled S&W model 681 357 mag. It is the sidearm I learned to shoot with and qualified with for carry in uniform while in my county’s sheriff reserve. It was accurate enough at close combat ranges of our qualification course. The snubbies were a joke. The sheriff could not qualify on the same course as we did with his personal hideaway snub.

    • parlayer

      Elect another sheriff.

      • James Foley

        He’s already gone! :)

        • parlayer

          did new guy run on accuracy?? or credibility??

    • gutterfalcon

      I used to have a S&W 66, 2 1/2 ” Bar. it shot really nice.

  • James Maxwell

    My wife had to used a .38 when an intruder tried to break in our home back in 77, the next day
    she had me go down to the gun store in San Antonio and get a .357 with a longer barrel. She
    is a much better shot than I am now with that weapon for sure. I love my .45 but it has to much
    “slap” as she says for her taste. She loves the .357 with the first round a shot shell than wad cutters
    to back them up.

    • gutterfalcon

      I don’t believe those shot shells will do any good. I too carry a .45. Wad cutters are for competition, nice clean cut round holes for measuring. But what I carry is hollow points.

    • UnCL3

      If I am forced to shoot someone, that means shoot to kill. No light loads, no warning shot, just center mass.

      • ElderAmbassador

        And several times!!

        • UnCL3

          YUP…wouldn’t want to be sued by a relative and have the perp walking the planet and taking up space :-)

      • Onteo

        No more center mass in new York. Head shots only

        • UnCL3

          haha!
          I won’t be going there any time soon. If I can’t conceal carry with my TX license, chances are good I’m not going there.

      • Dr. Strangelove

        I shoot to incapacitate. Death may be a byproduct, however.

        • UnCL3

          In the heat of the fight (of which I have NO real-world first hand experience), I’m not relying on trying to injure; that could get you killed. My training at competitions focuses mainly on center mass. When the Range Officer starts the timer, even on paper targets, the adrenaline is flowing. These are situational scenarios that are set up. Typically 4 or 5 stages per match. Shooting on the move, from cover, close quarters combat, etc. That is pretty exciting; I can only imagine having to actually engage a live bad guy. I’m relying on the training, and hopefully it will result in a dead bad guy, and me and mine safe.

    • John Hand

      A 357 with a longer barrel?’ You just compounded the problem I described above. Go on, fire that revolver sometime in the dark. Make it an enclosed space. Oh, and be sure not to have ear protecters on such as would happen in a real break in situation. I read a news report once, of two policemen who had trained for years in firing their revolvers. Then one night they both had to use them in a darkened alley. The flash of light and the noise so confused them that they could not get back on target.

      • James Maxwell

        John if the flash of light and sound of a round being discharged confused them
        then I would suggest they find another occupation. I have been in various
        training scenarios while in the military. The light and sound are part of that
        training. If you are in a darkened area you do not fire unless you have a clear
        target and can identify what you are shooting at because it might be an innocent
        and it also reveals you position to a possible shooter.

        • John Hand

          But you didn’t fire a ,38 snub in those military training scenarios, did you? A target can come out of the night so fast that you do not have time to point, aim, and shoot. And in that situation, I would rather have a gun that has less blast effect and is quieter. Remember the subject of this blog, the revolver as a defense weapon, and the topic is how they are NOT a good weapon.

          • James Maxwell

            I knew many pilots in Nam who carried a .38 stubby as a back up weapon
            in Nam. You train and use instinct to survive when dealing with the
            enemy. John I seriously doubt you have ever been in a life threatening
            situation and I hope you never are. I personally carried a .22 magnum
            derringer as a back up weapon. Not worth a damm over 20′ but it was
            effective and I still have the pair. It is not always the size of the weapon
            but the person and their training when using it.

          • Scott Ferguson

            If you fire any firearm inside of the confines of a home, you’ll both be disoriented if you’ve never experienced it.

          • James Maxwell

            Late at night inside any building a flash and loud noise will disorient
            the vast majority of people, especially if you have just been woken
            from a sound sleep. There are gun ranges in my area that offer training
            for gun owners that can simulate such events to give you an idea as to
            what it might be like. Most start off with you wearing ear protection which
            is very much different than real life. After they have run you thru the
            house a couple of times they remove the protection and have you lay
            on a bed with all the lights out. then you hear the intruder and react
            accordingly. This training is done with live people but using blank ammo.
            to give you real time experience in what it might be like. All the simulation
            goes out the door the first time you go thru a live fire(w/Blanks) event.
            They will also help you sit up a defense zone in your home base on
            the layout of your home. Gives you some ideas as to how to help
            make your home less attractive to criminals.

      • Dr. Strangelove

        Most modern self defense ammo, such as Speer Gold Dots, have flash suppressants so they won’t affect night vision.

    • Edmund Charles

      Try a .45 acp revolver, S&W 25-2, S&W 625, etc.

  • Zundfolge

    I have long held that the J Frame snubbie is an expert’s weapon … with practice they can be awesome (I really miss a 340 M&P in .357mag I sold a while back) but I’m amazed how many people think these things are a good beginner’s gun (especially for women).

    Most women do significantly better with 1911s of various sizes chambered in .45acp … recoil is manageable and the grips usually fit smaller hands much better.

    • SIRWIZARD

      I agree in principle, Zundfolge. It is sometimes worthwhile to become an expert anyway…just for the sake of being an expert. ABSOLUTELY, a 1911 has less recoil than a light .38, but hiding a 1911 almost requires MAGIC unless you’re wearing a coat.

      • DenverKitty

        Sir, I can hide a Bersa Ultra Compact .45 ACP very easily IWB of my jeans shorts.

        • SIRWIZARD

          Hi, DenverKitty. I can too, but it annoys the heck out of me after an hour or so. Yes, I know carrying isn’t supposed to be about comfort, but at my age, comfort has to count, so I usually opt for a shoulder rig when I strap on the .45. I guess I’m getting old and finicky…but I can still shoot 50 out of 50 on the pistol range. Keeps my army EXPERT badge from tarnishing.

          • John Hand

            Yes, the EXPERT badge. I presume you mean the one for a pistol. I shot SHARPSHOOTER back in 1958, had never had any training, and one of the days my company got the training (basic training at Fr. Ord. CA) I was doing KP. So I missed some of it with the M1 Garand. They were doing some kind of testing of the trainees, where they were scoring the drill instructors. During one test I was supposed to mount a grenade launcher, and I had not had that training since I was doing KP the day our company had the training. So the testers got all over me because I could not do it. Grrrr, not fair. But I fired Sharpshooter and had to wear that lower grade badge all the years of the rest of my career. No chance for an upgrade as far as I know.

          • SIRWIZARD

            Hello, John. I was in the army so long I qualified initially with the M1903 Springfield, then the M1, then the M14, M16, Thompson sub-machinegun, M60 machine gun, the .38 Special, M1911A1, and the M9 9mm. Each qualification was an opportunity to win a new badge. There are some that have a MARKSMAN Badge for M14 and an EXPERT Badge with an M16. You can’t really ‘Upgrade’ what you have, because it was for M1. You’d have to re-qualify with the M1 and that is no longer available for military qualification. In my case, I managed to qualify EXPERT with all those mentioned above. I have one EXPERT Badge, with a ‘bar’ hanging under it for each weapon. Because that makes a ridiculous looking ‘ladder’, I only wore the rifle, machine-gun, and pistol bars.

          • John Hand

            SIRWIZARD, I can relate to what you are saying about the badges. My career did not provide the opportunity to go on and win more badges. I did three years initially in the regular Army and got the SHARPSHOOTER badge. Then got out, and years later joined the Reserve and did some weekends and a summer camp or two, then, because Nixon had signed away the draft, the military including the Reserve could not fill the ranks so they placed (voluntarily) thousands of us on active duty to serve as recruiters. I recruited for years, going from Los Angeles to Denver, winning my own form of badges in the way of plaques and trophies for Recruiter of the Year. Then switched to the career/counseling field and moved on to two more states before I retired. So although I had to re-qualify each year with the M16, there were no badges. Oh, for anyone else reading this, the word is not RESERVES. There is no S on the end of the word. It is Army Reserve, Navy Reserve, whatever. Even if you add them together, the correct term is Reserve Forces, not reserves.

          • SIRWIZARD

            You did well, John. Recruiting was, is, and always will be an important function. More so than a Qualification Badge. HOOAH!

          • Edmund Charles

            It’s been reported many times that those personnel (Police or Military) who are most proficient on the sterile confines of the gun range shooting at paper stationary tagets do not do very well in actual life/death moving target engagements. This skill can only be obtained by real wrold experince, the analogy is thes ame as playing poker with fake chips and that of using real money- totally different.

      • Zundfolge

        I dunno, a defender/Ultra Carry sized (3″) 1911 is only slightly larger than a J Frame … and I can easily and comfortably conceal my full size CZ-75 B SA .40 (which is as large as a double stack Government Model 1911) so with the right rig you’d be surprised what you can carry. Now for the ladies I understand that’s probably more difficult, but that still leaves the Officer size and smaller 1911s

  • gutterfalcon

    When I take a NEW shooter, I have them shoot a .22 first, so they Don’t develop a Flinch.

    • ElderAmbassador

      Good idea, and it gives them some confidence when they can hit the target early in the session. Then you can transition to a larger caliber when they are ready for it.

  • Lynn McCrann

    I own a 38 snub nose five shot and the first two rounds are ratshot, the other lead. I also have available my late husbands 357 magnum pistol which is fully loaded. Does that make me a terrorist?

    • SIRWIZARD

      Are you expecting trouble with rats or people? No, Lynn, it doesn’t make you a terrorist, but it makes you seem confused about your potential target.

      • ElderAmbassador

        I frequently carry my .44 Spl 5 shot with a “shot” cartridge first up, especially when in the desert. It doesn’t take long to transition to a solid.

        • SIRWIZARD

          Right you are…and the good old .44 is a caliber to be respected!

          • John Hand

            A 44 non magnum only comes out of a two inch barrel at around 800 fps or less. But I used to have a Charter Arms 44 five shot that originally was a three inch and had been professionally cut to two inch, and with the wooden butt on it, it was really a nice weapon. But it got burglarized in Denver and I never replaced it. It was probably the most comfortable fit of any gun I had in my hand. But times change, and GLOCKS rule. Oh, unless you have an FN 5.7. Now that is a fine weapon, but costs about $11-1200 to purchase.

      • Lynn McCrann

        Sir, this weapon is in my nightstand next to my bed. Easy to reach and rather effective in close quarters; enough so that it would stop or at least slow down a threat before I fire the remaining rounds and the six in my 357 magnum. I am an armory of one as I see it.

        • http://www.jamesehorn.com/ Jim Horn

          If the intruder is stoked up on powerful mind altering drugs, you need something to knock hem down because a few holes in them takes a while to work, by which time you could be dead.

          Army .38’s didn’t stop drug stoked 160 pound Moros in the Philippines a hundred years ago. That’s why the Army commissioned the .45. It stops them first, then they bleed.

    • UnCL3

      You only have 5 rounds. My advice is make ALL of them lethal. If you really need to shoot someone, shoot center mass with a decent load.

      • Lynn McCrann

        UnCL3, Two rat, three lead and 6 magnum, all near by. I really would prefer to only shoot to stop a threat rather than kill and that is my reason for the ratshot.

        • UnCL3

          I get it…but think about this…anyone coming into your home while you are there is looking for WAY more than theft. Snakeshot might make someone that brazen say ouch, but that’s about it.

        • Abad Don

          The only way to stop a threat is to use as much lethal force as possible. Use all rounds, center mass and make them bleed out quickly. Otherwise, your attacker is still mobile and a threat to you and/or others with you. Anything less is just pissing in the wind.

        • conservative

          A dead threat is a stopped threat.

  • sharpshooter003

    bought my son a new ultra-lite 5 shot .38 after about a hundred rds. the cylinder literally fell out of the frame at the range …. luckily no one was hurt . range owner gave 75% of what I paid for it at a major retailer after they basically told me to pound sand …. never do business with them again

  • Rotten Rex

    I feel adequately armed with a .22 pistol if that is all I have. But I have many years experience and I don’t flinch; can shoot them in the nose hole every time.

  • Docs357

    My first choice was a 357 mag with a 4 inch barrel. Moving up to .40 S&W auto loader I use. 357 msg snub nose with + P or magnum loads it’s a five shot back up gun that’s what I use for and it’s a great backup it is target accurate at 21 feet either load will penetrate deep into the inner body cavity that’s what it is intended for. Small compacted A back up gun

  • Deadman Walking Wildman

    My 380, 40 S&w, 45 Auto and my 9 all have Hydra shock semi- jacketed Hollow points in them.

  • Yarply Twelve

    Why would anyone buy a 38 when they can get a 357 mag?and have the best of both worlds. Rhino 200DS

  • SIRWIZARD

    I don’t usually respond to posts about guns, but I have qualified with almost EVERYTHING over the three plus decades I spent in the army, and I have a LOT of experience. Any double-action revolver is tough to master quickly. It takes a bunch of practice to be able to pull the trigger through a long stroke while keeping the sights on target. A short barrel doesn’t help…but if you spend the practice time and master the gun, you’ll find it fits the pocket or whatever well. A .38 WILL stop an assailant if the shot is well placed, but that’s difficult in a real situation. The army learned that in the early 1900’s in the Philippines. That’s precisely why the .45 cal M1911 was developed. So either learn to be really good with a .38 or carry a 1911…which will remind you why a .38 revolver is cool. If you’ve ever tried to conceal a .45 cal 1911, you’ll know what I mean. If you choose to become an expert with a .38, plan to place TWO shots in rapid succession. Two .38 cal holes are almost as good as one .45 cal hole. Anyone that ever fired a modern, light weight .38 High Velocity and a .45 cal 1911 knows that the recoil of the little snubbie is MORE than the 1911 recoil. 9MM advocates will have to admit that the .38 and the 9mm are essentially identical in size and similar in effect…with the .38+P the winner most often. Whatever you carry, learn to use it well. If you HATE what you carry, who does that help? If the gun is for a lady the same rules apply to them. More to consider: If you get into a running fight and you have to conceal yourself, do you want to leave a trail of cartridges like that automatic? If you have to fire your piece from inside your pocket, how will that automatic do? How about a hammerless J-Frame .38? Yes, you can carry more ammo in magazines, but, for the most part, if you need more than the 5 or 6 rounds in a revolver, you may be in over your head. Of course, when I say .38, you know that it could just as easily be a .357 magnum. Police stats show that on average, 2.4 rounds are expended each time a bad guy is brought down.

    • John Hand

      Times change SIRWIZARD. I’m retired Army too but it is highly probable you spent more field time than I did. When I am on the road, I now carry a 10 mm Glock in a hard plastic holster on the left side of my waist and tipped so that I can pull and use it with my right hand while I steer with my left. The possibility of having to fire out the window of a moving vehicle is always there, and that 10 mm, with the stopping power of a 41 mag, is a nice piece. The recoil by the way, is negligible as far as I am concerned. With the adjustable holster, it does not dig into my belly or anything and is very comfortable. When I am on foot, having to go in and out of establishments for instance, I wear either a Glock 45 that shoots 7 or a Glock 9mm that fires 16. Both guns fit the same soft right hand outside the belt holster, and I can’t decide which gun is better in the real world, the power of the 45 but only 7 rounds, or the repeated firing of 16 rounds. They are fairly easy to conceal during the winter, not so easy in the summer, but here in Alabama, we have open carry. .

  • David

    My S&W .38 has a 6 inch barrel, and I alternate HP and FMJ rounds in mine … 3 of each.
    A Snub Nose is for very close range … used for Concealed Carry usually.

    • ElderAmbassador

      I consider them to be “Belly Guns” to be used in very close quarters. Then I run for the ’97 Trench Gun WITH bayonet attached!

  • Ranchman

    I used to own a Charter Arms Bulldog in ,44 Special, 2 or 2 1/4 inch barrel, 5 shot, which I totally regret selling. Yeah, I would make sure I packed a pair of padded shortie shooting gloves when I went to the range but, it wasn’t so bad with the specials loaded in it. I could shoot 2 to 3 inch groups at 20 feet or so, not too shabby. The sights on that old gun weren’t too bad either. I’d buy another one in a heartbeat.

    • John Hand

      Ranchman, the Bulldog in stock condition was/is a 3 inch. Like I said further up, I had one that was professionally cut to two inch. You wore gloves to fire it? Why? Always shoot in the mode you would using in a real life threatening situation. Of course, if you are practicing indoors and running a lot of rounds, of course wear ear protectors, but remember, that is not real world.

  • ron44

    357 is a heavy gun hard to aim and if your wrist is worn out then it can give you a problem..if your hands are strong and not worn out from a working life using them, then you probably wil be ok..practice. practice practice is what you will need.

  • UnCL3

    I can’t really “carry” during the week while working, but I do have a Taurus Model 85 SS j-frame in my center console. After work, it gets tucked in and carried. I see NOTHING wrong with this type of revolver for this role. Frankly, in a self defense situation, if the target is out of my “comfort zone” of engagement, I am not going to engage. The best gunfight you’ll ever be in is the one you can get away from. Weekend carry is a 9mm Springfield XDS, and the same rule applies to it.

    • SIRWIZARD

      I love to hear such gun wisdom from a lady. I can’t argue with anything you said. You’ve thought through what works for you, and I almost feel sorry for anyone in your sights (but not for long).

      • UnCL3

        um…not a lady ;-) don’t let the avatar fool ya…
        I just hope I never have to use lethal force, but should the need befall me, I’m trained and ready. I do situational pistol and carbine competitions on the weekends at the gun club. I’m no expert, for sure, but I’m competent, and comfortable with my gear.

      • John Hand

        Surprised SIRWIZARD that you did not recognize the lovely face of our friend Nancy Pelosi that UnCL3 is using as his I.D. I wonder sometimes how commenters come up with these weird names, like UnCL3. Does that mean that somewhere out there is a UnCl2? Now me, I use my real name because anything you write you should not be afraid to put your name on it. But I know that Barack and Eric are watching…

  • TangoTommy

    I recall when I started the class for my concealed carry permit. The instructor started off by saying, “If you are not prepared to take a human life, you have no business picking up a hand gun.” After a long silence, three people (out of 20) walked out. Wadcutters, rat shot etc. are not designed to kill people..I’ll keep my 45ACP, and always with 2 extra clips.

    • John Hand

      OK Tango Tommy. You carry clips with your 45 ACP, and I’ll carry magazines.

      • TangoTommy

        Clips, magazines, whatever. You get the idea. Actually, my proffered weapon of choice for home defense is a Remington Model 1100 loaded with buckshot.

      • Dr. Strangelove

        Unfortunately, clip has become part of todays lexicon. I think that may have derived from the thousands of soldiers who came back from WWII after loading their Garands with actual clips.

  • Steven

    The myth isn’t that a .38 snub nose is a good first gun. The myth is that ANY good is good for everyone, or that you can predict which gun is good for an individual without sending lead down range.

  • John Hand

    ‘Mastering’ the 38 revolver is only part of it. That gun is LOUD, loud as in…OUCH MY EARS! I have Glocks now amongst other stuff, but still have a couple of 38 snubs lying around. About three years ago I took all the guns to a range, and just for fun I fired ONE SHOT of my 38 snub with no ear protectors on. My ears were ringing for 15 minutes. Imagine what that would sound like indoors, as in a woman’s bedroom as she fires it off in the dark and the blast and the flash of light terrorize her so much that she can not find herself in order to get the second shot off, and the intruder she missed manages to overpower her….

  • Bisley

    If you’re talking about a “first gun”, that really is the first, a .22 rimfire is the only practical option. Someone who has never shot before needs to learn the basics of proper grip, sight picture and trigger control, with something that doesn’t roar like a cannon, jump out of their hand, or cost so much to feed that they can’t afford to shoot it. Only after burning through numerous bricks of .22s, learning the proper technique and becoming accurate and comfortable with it, should the beginner move to higher powered guns. Once you know what you’re doing and can shoot accurately, it’s much easier to transfer your skills to something more difficult. If you start out with a gun that has a lot of buck and blast, you’re almost guaranteed to develop an accuracy-destroying flinch and can’t afford to shoot enough to become proficient, anyway.

    Small, lightweight handguns are very difficult to shoot well and, if they have any power, recoil at a painful level. While I sometimes carry one, when not wearing enough clothing to hide anything bigger, it certainly wouldn’t be my first choice and particularly not for a first gun. Choosing a gun to carry is something to be done after learning to shoot well, not before, and consists of a series of compromises between size, weight, caliber, capacity, personal preference, etc. My recommendation is the biggest, most powerful gun you can shoot well, carry comfortably and keep out of sight. This is different for everyone.

  • Lew Stamper

    I have a Ruger SP101 2 1/2″ barrel. I have qualified with it on several police ranges and it does a fine job. I would not recommend this for the smaller ladies hand as it is a bit on the heavy side.

  • Scotty

    If you know how to shoot the gun you use shouldn’t be problem,that a personal preference the same fundamentals apply.I bought my wife a snubbie for her first gun she’s pretty good with it.

  • Ronald R. Johnson

    Bull, I’ve owned and carried on my hip a Five shot Charter Arm sub nosed 38 since 1970 and it is as great today as it was the day I bought it and I can still hit what I aim at. I don’t need it for long range, it is only used for self defense up close. I also have a six shot Colt snub nosed and I also can hit what I aim at with it too and have had it since 1971 and carry it on my ankle!

  • David R Matzen

    As a small (1 person) gunsmith/FFL business- I would have to say that in the past year I have had more people ask for a Glock- Here is how the pitch goes-
    Customer: I want a Glock 17 for my Wife/girlfriend/other.
    ME: has this person ever fired a handgun before?
    Customer: Nope, doesn’t matter- thats what I read- Glock 17 is Perfect for a first time shooter.
    ME: Sir, this is just my opinion but I would recommend a revolver of a smaller caliber to start for a first time shooter.
    Customer: WHY? everything I read said Glock 17 is perfect.
    ME: Right? well there is felt recoil, noise, working the action, ect… A revolver is almost fail safe for a first time shooter. Start off with a .22lr in a semi auto atleast.
    Customer: Well are you a Certified Glock Dealer?
    ME: No sir I am not!
    Customer: Well how can you recommend something else then the Glock if you are not a certified Dealer?
    ME: Well I am a certified Sig Sauer armorer but I am not recommending you start off with that.
    So My point is, in My opinion, start someone off with a revolver, the mechanics are more failsafe for a new shooter compared to a semi-auto. the .38 is a decent sized round for a man stopper, and its about the most common round produced in a revolver( or was, probably lost out to the .357 mag now), when you figure in cost of firearm, ammo, ect… And I would recommend a .38 revovler over a Glock 17 any day of the week to someone who is new to firearms.
    David

    • John Hand

      But have you field tested a revolver in a darkened bedroom with no ear protectors? I think you might find that an automatic is highly preferable. I am soooo glad that I have never come into your shop for advice.

    • Edmund Charles

      The response from the FFL person should have been, ‘legally I am sellling this gun to you,however if you want your wife or girlfriend to have a firearm for self protection, please have them come in here and I’ll fit them out with a pistiol that suites their needs and temperment’. Never try and purchase a firearms for another person to use, it is bot illegal and dangerous.

  • Cooleemee Edd

    Right! I started off with a single-shot muzzle-loading pistol, then moved on to a .22 revolver, then a .38 with a long barrel. It wasn’t until I was in the military that I was issued a snubbie, and then I bought one myself that wasn’t a WWII relic (like the Army used for CI Agents). It is no firearm for a beginner, man or woman!

  • Mark

    Good article. Very true. I wish I would have read this prior to buying my S & W airweight thinking my wife could handle it no problem. boy was I wrong.

  • JB Andrews

    Get a KelTec 9mm. Worked every time it was field tested on Trayvon Martin. One shot drop as I recall.

    • John Hand

      I hate to make a comparison between Trayvon and Ft Hood. The Muslim shooter at Ft Hood used a FN 5.7. Holds umpteen rounds, has no recoil, none, is accurate almost to the point of being a rifle, and even fully loaded is lighter I think than a 38 snub. Now that is a weapon, but hard to find, costs $1100-1200, and the ammo also is hard to find. But they also have a rifle that shoots 50 rounds or so, and it uses the same ammo.

  • John Hand

    The writer comes out with a good opening paragraph. How the salesman is telling the husband or the wife how this revolver is a great starting point…etc. Reminds me of how those Harley riders, when the old lady finally decides she is tired of hanging onto the back and wants to do her own riding. So what does hubby do, he buys her a Sportster. Yuk. That design is almost 50 years old, and has not been changed in the meantime, oh yes, they do have an electric start now. The bike is uncomfortable, slow, noisy and over priced. But it’s a Harley, right? There are much better bikes for the little lady to ride, and they usually come from Japan. A new one from Yamaha I think is the brand, has a bike called the Bolt. Looks like the Sportster, but is a much better bike. The same thing goes for these little revolvers. If she is going to the mall, or walking around the house alone, a Ruger 380 with a laser that comes on when you wrap your fingers around the butt, for instance. My wife has one. Smith and Wesson I believe it is makes a very narrow 9 mm called the Shield. A weapon such as these is what the wife needs.

  • John Gould

    For over 7 months on a coarse running, jumping and all other settings. I went through 300-350 .38 rounds every sat. morning and more wed. night shooting lighted targets from a pick up buddy shooting. That was many yrs. ago in AZ. every sat. 7 meters to 100 yards to qualify. I purchased factory reloads at $5.50 for a plastic bag of $5.00. never had a problem. Only had a problem with using some ones private reload. Had to clear the barrel with a hammer and a wooden rod. You can, with allot of practice hit the bulls eye area every time at a hundred yards. The coarse was only survival shooting. No competition. Also with a AR-15. Not as many rounds. Instructors were ex Green berets and the head instructor was a ex swat team commander from LA, Calif. We all out shot the Phoenix swat team buy a long ways. They destroyed all the target frames. Were not allowed to return. Out of 22 of us, we hit the frames once. Everytime we hit a target frame, it cost us a $1.00. These instructors carried .357’s but only shot .38 rounds. They also carried .45’s. All their weapons had trigger jobs and once in awhile their $1500 45’s would go automatic faster than a machine gun. That was rare tho. I don’t shoot anymore and can’t hit the side of a barn when placed inside, I tried once. Hahahahahaha

  • John Gould

    4 inch barrel .38. I had the cylinders bored out to shoot .357 rnds.