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About the “Mousegun” Round

Shooting

About the “Mousegun” Round

There has been a great deal of resentment surrounding the .223 Remington cartridge since its inception during the 1950s, and continuing right up to this day with no less, and no more, an eminence than Jeff Cooper disdainfully dismissing it as “a mouse gun round.”

Formally introduced in 1964 as the military’s Ball Cartridge M193 round for the experimental semi-automatic and light automatic rifles designed by Eugene Stoner, L. James Sullivan and Robert Fremont of ArmaLite Division of Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation, the 5.56 X 45mm (nee .222 Special) or 5.56mm NATO had evolved along parallel lines with the .222 Remington Magnum (nee .224 Springfield) cartridge, but with roughly one grain less of case capacity.

(The “triple deuce magnum,” a prototypal military round for use in light combat arms, had itself been developed jointly by Remington Arms Company and U.S. Springfield Armory¹ in the mid-’50s as part of Project SALVO.²)

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