Connect with us

Federal gun-shop liability law challenged in Alaska

2nd Amend.

Federal gun-shop liability law challenged in Alaska

A Bush-era federal law that protects gun dealers from being liable for murders committed with guns from their shops is under fire in an Alaska court case that has led the Justice Department and gun-control activists to intervene.
At issue is whether a Juneau gun dealer is liable for letting a disheveled homeless felon leave his store with a rifle he used to murder a total stranger. The family of the murder victim, Anchorage contractor Simone Kim, has filed a wrongful death lawsuit that has made it to the Alaska Supreme Court.
The Kims are challenging the constitutionality of the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, which effectively protects the gun industry from most lawsuits.
“It’s a very important case. This is the first state Supreme Court that will be deciding the breadth of the law as it applies to gun dealers who supply criminals with guns and profit from that,” said Jonathan Lowy, an attorney with the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence in Washington, who is acting as co-counsel for the Kims.
Jason Coday, a drifter with a police record in Utah and Nevada, arrived in Juneau on Aug. 2, 2006. Within hours, Coday walked into Rayco Sales gun shop wearing a garbage bag around his waist, which was filled either with his belongings or with a sleeping bag – there’s some dispute over that point.
“Throughout the surrounding weeks Coday (had) repeatedly exhibited bizarre behavior, with

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.


More in 2nd Amend.

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.

To Top
STAY IN THE LOOP
Don't miss a thing. Sign up for our email newsletter to become a Patriot Outdoor News insider.

Send this to friend