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Study Finds Chemicals in Marijuana Farms Harm Wildlife

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Study Finds Chemicals in Marijuana Farms Harm Wildlife

A study by scientists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service, the Integral Ecology Research Center, and several California Universities have found that the pesticides and rat poison used on marijuana farms are harmful to wildlife.

The study specifically examined the population of fishers, also known as fisher cats, in California’s Sierra National Forest. A number of dead fisher specimens in the wild have found to contain traces of rodenticide poisoning, which marijuana farms use to kill rats and mice. Chemicals found at these farms can also prove harmful to a multitude of vulnerable animals including bobcats, stoats, mountain lions, badgers, and Red-tailed Hawks.

Fishers are a top concern for conservationists because the species is threatened and a potential candidate for federal protections. Female fishers, more likely to make dens near these farms, are critically threatened by the poisons distributed at these locations.

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