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Pitchin’ And Twitchin’ Stoneflies and Terrestrials

Fishing

Pitchin’ And Twitchin’ Stoneflies and Terrestrials

When you’re moving the fly correctly, there should be slight V-shaped wake on the water like the fly is running across the surface.
Many fly fishers experience in their streamside education is gently casting a mayfly dun imitation to sipping trout, and delicately mending line to achieve a drag-free drift. Whether you are dead-drifting a Sulphur imitation on a Pennsylvania limestone spring creek, or presenting a Pale Morning Dun emerger on the Railroad Ranch section of the Henry’s Fork in Idaho, casting small dry flies to rising trout loosely defines our sport, much like walking with a double shotgun behind a good pointer in the ruffed grouse woods of the Northeast could be considered the essence of upland bird hunting. Many Western fly fishers, however, while tipping their hats to the subtle grace of these long-standing traditions, eagerly anticipate a few months each year when they can replace a delicate dead-drift with a frantic twitch.
Almost all stoneflies and terrestrial insects that end up on the water wiggle, squirm, kick, crawl, run, and skitter, eliciting predatory strikes from trout focusing on the motion of their prey.
Our match-the-hatch traditions inform us that trout identify food forms by their size, profile, and color. However, in many instances motion is just as important, as any fisherman who has swung a soft-hackle wet fly through a tailout, or skated a large hackled spider across the surface, would agree.

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