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How 14 Wolves Completely Changed Yellowstone National Park

Hunting

How 14 Wolves Completely Changed Yellowstone National Park

In 1995, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, along with Canadian biologists, captured 14 wolves in Canada and placed them in Yellowstone National Park, where they had been extinct since 1926. Over the next few years, the number of wolves rose, but that was the least of the changes that took place in Yellowstone.

In 1995, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, along with Canadian biologists, captured 14 wolves in Canada and placed them in Yellowstone National Park, where they had been extinct since 1926. Over the next few years, the number of wolves rose, but that was the least of the changes that took place in Yellowstone.

The effects were more striking than anyone could have expected. The entire ecosystem of the national park transformed and it went so far that even the rivers changed. How could this have happened? Watch the clip and marvel at the amazing way in which nature works.

Introducing a predator into an ecosystem that was without one for 70 years will without a doubt improve the uneven balance of grazers to grazing land.

But what happens when the number of predators exceeds the necessary amount needed to maintain deer and elk populations?

What happens when the numbers grow to the point where their territories need to be extended into areas outside of the park?

What happens when livestock are targeted and people’s homes fall inside these super predator’s territory?

Over the last 30 years, since wolves have been reintroduced, this has become a growing concern for many states in the lower 48.

It wasn’t until recently that state and local officials addressed the growing need for tags to be given out to help reduce the number of wolves in certain areas.

Hunting these predators is allowed in: Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Minnesota, Michigan, Wyoming, and Wisconsin (with a nearly impossible to get wolf tag).

However, it’s a never ending battle between ranchers, conservationists and the government.

With seasons sometimes abruptly coming to a halt, or being canceled all together.

The fight for putting wolves in a protected class has been an ongoing battle with both sides refusing to give up.

The ranchers, of course, aim to protect their livelihood and livestock.

the conservation groups claim the animals are too few in numbers to regulate and too crucial to the ecosystem to allow hunting.

 

 

 

 

 

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