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AR Lube Advice From The Experts

Shooting

AR Lube Advice From The Experts

My daily carry pistol is a Glock, and Glocks are pretty much unique in the firearms world in that they seem to work just as well whether dry or well-lubed. On the other end of that spectrum is the AR-15, which is universally acknowledged to run better “wet.”

Over the years I have accumulated a dozen wonder lubes, some of them specifically formulated for the AR-15 platform. Out of curiosity I recently asked a number of shooting acquaintances what they preferred for lubing the AR-15. What I found fascinating was not just the number of home recipes, but how no two answers to my question were identical.

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  • Jaime Cancio

    I was once told in the State of California I was the second person to own a Colt AR15 SP1. I have had my share of ARs, 24 inch HiBars, and CAR15s. Long since sold them all away. I remember purchasing .223/5.56mm 55grain FMJ mil-spec ammo for a penny a round in 10,000 bulk purchase; and, one year shooting out four barrels in my second AR15. The best results ever shooting the ARS was in handloading with particular care, Match-Grade performance and better obtained with the Seirra MatchKing 53 Grain Hollow Point Boat Tailed bullets using CCI Mag Rifle Primers using Norma cases. and every flash hole drilled to the exact same diameter flash hole, cases trimmed to lenght, case mouths chambered inside and out and the cases full length resized to once fired case dimensions…using an IMR powder that filled the cartridge case so that the bullet once seated sat atop the gun powder without crushing the powder. 1/4 inch groups at 100 yards possible using ART 3×9 Scope and Mount. I also found out a FN FNC in 5.56mm the better and superior weapon.

    There are a few things I learned of the AR15; shooting military spec. ammo all ARs will start to jam around 600 to 650 rounds; carbon fouling impedes the bolt assembly in its rearward travel and models without forward bolt assist the only way to clear the ‘jammed’ bolt assembly was to grip the bolt charging handle, engage the charging handle release, and then immediately slam the butt of the stock on the ground that would force movement of the bolt to clear the jam. You could keep shooting until the next jam, and the next, until the rifle actually seized up and bolt would have to mechanically freed.

    The better methodology to clear the AR was as stated above and slamming the butt of the stock on the ground forcing ejection of the spent round and clearing the bolt; drop the magazine, clear the firearm, and dismantle the rifle and immediately wiping down the bolt to clean it and then wiping away debris in bolt race war, perhaps taking only few moments, then reinsert the charging handle, bolt and close the weapon and locking rear receiver pin. You could again shoot out to about 600 rounds before a similar jam occurred. There is nothing like keeping the weapon clean and well lubed to keep it working.

    My little discovery that extended the ability of the AR15 to reach over 1,000 rounds before jamming was a lubrication product that made the weapon impervious to salt water or fresh water damage; it was not silcone based. It proved to be the most effective lubrication of all the products and special blend lubricants as given the example in the article.

    The product was a white grease specifically made for motor lubrication listed as White Grease Number 5 Salt Water Lubrican for Motors (high temperature useage). I would wipe all surfaces and pivoting areas of every inch of the AR15 including the stock. And then I would wipe it all away with the only item on the AR you could tell was protected was the color of the stock. I would shoot out over 2,000 rounds before I would experience similar jams that had occurred with other lubs around 600 rounds. One article in a gun magazine used the same lubricant on two different firearms and on two other similar firearms using only then current gun lubricants – and then put them in an area under seawater and left them in seawater for a full thirty days. The two thus lubricated when dried off and wiped clean looked like brand new; however, any areas not lubricated like pivot holes and pivot pins, were rusted and ruined. The other two firearms were rusty relics of what they once were.

    You might ask why I also used the lubricant on the stock; water could not find a away to cling to the stock, it would hit as in the case of rain and would just splat and the bulk of the water would bounce away. So little water on the stock and so easy to wipe away even in the worse downpour. One caution, this white grease on your hands takes forever to clear away, noticed too when using ball ammo orginally used in the first M16s in Vietnam, powder residue would contain moisture that help collect carbon debis inside the bolt assembly and gas tube on the bolt. Using the IMR powder and this lub held that problem at bay. By-the-way, don’t ever use a silcone based lubricant to ever coat the barrel of any firearm; silcone exposed to high enough temperature turns to glass so you can imagine the problems if used in the barrel of a firearm.

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