Connect with us

6 Cool Desert Dwellers You Should Know About

Email

6 Cool Desert Dwellers You Should Know About

Check this out.

1. The Party Animal
Found in southwestern Arizona, New Mexico and in parts of Texas, the white-nosed coati (coatimundi) is a relative of the raccoon. They weigh 10-25 pounds and stand 8 to 12 inches high, with a long, banded tail. These omnivorous animals feed on fruit and berries, as well as eggs, insects and lizards. Coatis are sociable creatures: They travel in bands and communicate with chirps, snorts and grunts.

coyote

2. The Trickster
In many Native American legends, the coyote is a trickster with a reputation for outsmarting others. Perhaps this is because coyotes are resilient, adaptable animals that thrive in many environments and adjust their behavior to match conditions. They’re predators, but they’re not above scavenging or even eating plants, such as the “coyote melon.” Coyotes can run up to 40 miles per hour and will jump fences up to 8 feet high. Desert-dwelling coyotes are smaller than average, weighing about 20 pounds.

mountain-lion

3. The Mountain Screamer
Sometimes called cougar, panther, catamount, or even, colloquially, the mountain screamer, the mountain lion isn’t really a lion at all. It’s missing the special larynx that larger cats have, so it cannot roar. However, it can purr, growl and even make a spine-chilling scream. Most of the time, though, the mountain lion’s prey will not hear a thing until it’s far too late. For an animal that can weigh anywhere from 60 to 200 pounds, they move in silence. (As a note, the photo above was taken at the NRA Whittington Center…and we only saw the female mountain lion because her tail twitched briefly above the grass!)

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.


Continue Reading

More in Email

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.

To Top
STAY IN THE LOOP
Don't miss a thing. Sign up for our email newsletter to become a Patriot Outdoor News insider.

Send this to friend