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Hunting Tech of the Future? Scientists Discover Way to Inject Human Eyes with Night Vision

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Hunting Tech of the Future? Scientists Discover Way to Inject Human Eyes with Night Vision

Would you try it?

Many people think of night vision gear as cutting edge technology, and they wouldn’t be wrong. As evidenced by their exorbitant price, night vision scopes and goggles are highly sophisticated pieces of technology. Yet scientists are already looking into the next best thing: injecting temporary night vision directly into your eyes. Is it possible? Well, a research group called Science for the Masses has already done it by injecting a chemical called Chlorin e6 (Ce6) into human retinas. Ce6 is commonly used to treat cancer and night blindness in humans, and is occasionally found in some deep-sea fish. According to the researchers, it can also be used to improve dim light vision for several hours. Gabriel Licina, a biochem scientist on the team, volunteered to be a test subject.

Ce6 by itself is a sticky black powder, so the team had to mix it with insulin and other materials. Once a liquid, the Ce6 solution was applied directly to the conjunctival sac in the eye and was absorbed by the retina. Licina and other test subjects were given sunglasses to further reduce light conditions.

“The Ce6 solution has been shown to work in as little as one hour, with the effects lasting for ‘many hours’ afterwards. After 2 hours of adjustment, the subject and 4 controls were taken to a darkened area and subjected to testing,” the researchers wrote in their report. “Three forms of subjective testing were performed. These consisted of symbol recognition by distance, symbol recognition on varying background colors at a static distance, and the ability to identify moving subjects in a varied background at varied distances.”

The test was a success. Licina could make out dark shapes placed 10 meters away, and later at a distance of 25 to 50 meters. Although it may not be as effective as current night vision technology, researchers said the Ce6 injection had increased the participants’ ability to see in low light conditions.

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