Connect with us

Hunting with the .44 magnum handgun

Email

Hunting with the .44 magnum handgun

It took six shots to finally dispatch the badger, from a distance of only twenty five feet. On another occasion, it took four shots to take down a 250-pound black bear, from about twenty five yards away. Both times, I was using a .357 Magnum revolver. After the incident with the bear, I decided that a .44 Mag handgun is better suited for handgun hunting than a .357, and I’ve since reserved .357 Mag and .38 special loads for rabbit and small game.

In the badger’s case, the gun that shot him was a Colt Trooper Border Patrol revolver with a 4″ barrel, loaded with 125-gr JHP ammo — a well-known man stopper. I happened upon the badger while riding around my brother-in-law’s ranch on an ATV, and I saw it run off into some bushes. The 125-gr JHP .357 Mag round supposedly stops an attacker in his tracks 96% of the time, with one shot. Every shot hit the badger, and every shot should have put an end to his life — but it took six shots to do it.

For the bear, I used a S&W Model 686 with a 4″ barrel, loaded with Federal 180-gr cast SWC-style ammo. I had just pulled off the main road to one of my favorite hunting spots, when I spotted the bruin sitting on the side of the road, just twenty five yards away. I had my Winchester Model 70 .300 Win Mag rifle in a case in the back of my SUV, and I wasn’t able to get to it. So I stepped out of the car with my holstered S&W 686, and unlimbered on the black bear. It wasn’t until the 4th round that the bear took a tumble down the embankment into a creek, dead at last.

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.


More in Email

GET MORE STORIES LIKE THIS

IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.

To Top
STAY IN THE LOOP
Don't miss a thing. Sign up for our email newsletter to become a Patriot Outdoor News insider.

Send this to friend